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How To Go Public

By NAPS, North American Precis Syndicate

(NAPSI) -- Here's good news for businesses of all sizes and the people who work for them: Companies can raise capital to invest for growth and expansion—and unlike with bank loans and the like, this money doesn't have to be paid back. What's more, it's all perfectly legal.

That's because the money comes from selling your stock. Consider this: Wall Street's best-kept secret is that there is no minimum time in business, earnings or assets requirements to become a public company. Any company can go public. To help, the leading firm taking small and startup companies public, Tiber Creek Corporation, offers free reports about how it works.

An experienced firm can help you navigate the rules and regulations of going public and provide introductions to capital sources. You get your own stock symbol and investors can buy your stock with a broker or online.

Then you can use the shares almost like currency, such as when you want to merge with or acquire another company or to attract or reward quality employees. Simply give them stock options.

Learn More

For a free report and consultation, go to www.tcc5.com or call (310) 888-1870.


FRANCHISE TIMES MAGAZINE ARTICLE INTERVIEW OF TIBER CREEK'S CEO JAMES CASSIDY

Public Franchises - Own The Franchise, Own The Stock

A franchise company can gain many benefits from going public - liquidity, the ability to raise capital, prestige, greater perceived value in the marketplace, and the ability to make acquisitions using stock. We know that big publicly traded franchises out-perform their non-franchise counterparts, but what about the little guys?

Franchises that are only a few years old or have modest revenues might assume they are out of the game. The fact is, armed with the right information and a little help, anyone can go public. In this issue we continue our insider's view of taking a franchise public as we speak with James Cassidy of Tiber Creek Corporation.

Going public without an underwriter or an IPO

Tiber Creek Corporation specializes in taking small to mid-sized businesses public. Legal expertise is provided by President James Cassidy, a securities attorney with his own law firm in Washington, D.C. They take companies to the brokerage community and process them through the whole mechanism of becoming public.

Traditionally in the U.S., a company first goes to an underwriter who then raises the money to go public. James Cassidy says that's an excellent way to go, but it is not always necessary. He goes on, "Our specialty is taking companies public in transactions where they are not raising capital at the very same time they are going public. We work with companies that want to become public without an underwritten offering and without an IPO.

There are several reasons this might be the case. They may have raised some money privately and now want to give their shareholders a public market for their stock. Some companies want to have stock with a market value so they can make acquisitions of other companies using that stock. Others are planning ahead. They don't want to raise capital now, but are planning to do so in a year or two and are positioning themselves to be a public company with a good market value when the time comes.

One very common reason to go public is that companies are almost always valued higher than the very same company when it's privately held. Therefore, if you want to sell your company, it's not a bad idea to go public first because you're going to get a bigger price.

Cassidy says Tiber Creek Corp. levels the playing field for emerging companies, which usually operate below Wall Street's radar screen. "It is our belief that these smaller, less-known businesses can grow and prosper just as well as larger companies - if not better - with the proper help. In the U.S. there are no minimum asset or revenue requirements in going public. Most of the companies we work with tend to be a year or two old and have less than $25 million in assets or $25 million in sales," says Cassidy.

Markets for the rest of us

The principal markets for these new companies are the Pink Sheets and the OTC Bulletin Board. "Everybody knows the NYSE and the AMEX, but that is not normally where companies start to trade," Cassidy explains. "Unless you are a really big company, you start out trading on either the OTC or the Pink Sheets."

Cassidy points out that there is a significant difference between the two markets. "The OTC requires you to be a reporting company, filing regularly with the SEC every quarter, every year, and when certain things occur. And you have to have audited financial statements.

The Pink Sheets, however, is a gentler, easier market for a new company with small revenues. You do not have to be a reporting company and audited financial statements are not required. This used to be a very limited market, but since becoming electronic in 1999, the Pink Sheets has become a very nice alternative to the OTC. We are increasingly recommending it to smaller companies as the preferable choice rather than assuming the greater burdens of the OTC.

There are two main advantages to taking companies public via the OTC or Pink Sheets. They are less expensive and less hassle in terms of regulations and requirements. A company can go public for around $75,000 for the Pink Sheets and approximately $100,000 or less for the OTC Board. The reduction in ongoing costs is even more attractive. "Typically for small companies, annual costs for staying on the OTC are maybe $20-50,000, depending on the size of the company" says Cassidy. "On the Pink Sheets, most people subscribe to a service that allows them to publish their information for around $500 a year - and there are no legal costs at all to stay on it."

Tiber Creek is the industry leader in taking small companies public. Mr. Cassidy the CEO said that even a startup or foreign company can go public.

Tiber Creek Corporation is located in Beverly Hills, CA. You can visit their website at www.tcc5.com or contact them via telephone at 1-310-888-1870


How A Cannabis Company Can Go Public, Including A Start-Up

Here is an interesting yet little known fact; ANY company can go public. Yes, even a Cannabis company or a start-up company. What are the advantages of taking your company public? There are many, but the most obvious benefit is that typically capital raised from the sale of stock can be directly invested into your company for growth and expansion.

Unlike bank loans, money raised from going public does not need to be paid back. Meanwhile a venture capitalist will demand a significant ownership percentage in exchange for capital. Going public not only typically increases your company valuation but also allows you to retain a higher degree of ownership and control.

New states, including California with over 40 million people, have legalized the recreational use of marijuana, The cannabis industry is a very hot business sector right now. There are more and more states in the U.S. legalizing Cannabis and/or Hemp for a variety of uses, and providing entrepreneurial opportunities. So if you're still reading this then you're clearly interested in what it takes to go public and how it can work for your company.

The good news is that there is no minimum time in business, earnings or assets requirements to become a public company. As previously stated, any company can go public. The leading company taking small and startup companies public is Tiber Creek Corporation located in Beverly Hills, CA. The company president is a securities attorney. Their website is www.tcc5.com, They offer free reports about how a company can go public.

The president of Tiber Creek James Cassidy says "the most important aspect is to have a good pitch in which potential investors can see the growth potential of your company"

It is recommended to use an experienced firm to help you navigate the rules and regulations of going public. The Tiber Creek Corporation can do the legal filings and can also provide introductions to capital sources. You can get your own stock symbol and investors can buy your stock with a broker or online.

Many companies will use shares of public stock as currency. This comes into play when you seek to attract quality executives or reward loyal employees by giving them stock options. This added incentive provides them with a vested interest in your company's ongoing growth and success. You can also use stock as currency to perform mergers and acquisitions of your competitors or synergistic businesses.

Being a public company usually gives investors an exit strategy. Knowing it is possible to buy and sell stock gives them added confidence to invest in public companies. Unlike a private company, which has no exit strategy for investors.

Cannabis is a fast growing industry; discover how to tap into growth capital by going public. Going public is something companies will want to consider because it can often help with giving your company credibility and prestige, higher visibility and of course, the possibility of increased working capital acquired through the sale of stock.

tcc5.com offers a free consultation and going public reports. You can reach them by visiting their website or calling us at (310) 888-1870.

By CANNAINVESTOR MAGAZINE


Taking Your Company Public

(NAPSI) Here's good news for businesses of all sizes and the people who work for them: Companies can raise capital to invest for growth and expansion and unlike with bank loans and the like, this money doesn't have to be paid back. What's more, it's all perfectly legal.

That's because the money comes from selling your stock. Consider this: Wall Street's best-kept secret is that there is no minimum time in business, earnings or assets requirements to become a public company. Any company can go public. To help, the leading firm taking small and startup companies public, Tiber Creek Corporation, offers free reports about how it works.

An experienced firm can help you navigate the rules and regulations of going public and provide introductions to capital sources. You get your own stock symbol and investors can buy your stock with a broker or online.

Then you can use the shares almost like currency, such as when you want to merge with or acquire another company or to attract or reward quality employees. Simply give them stock options.

Learn More

For a free report and consultation, go to www.tcc5.com or call (310) 888-1870.


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